Monthly Archives: February 2016

You Can Now Contribute Web Development Content

Jafty Interactive Web Development has decided to start accepting user contributed blog posts! You can now submit any post that is related to out blog theme of web development and it will be published after admin moderation. As long as it is on topic and I think it improves the quality of my blog, it will probably be published. Some topics I would like to encourage users to submit posts about include:

  • PHP
  • JavaScript
  • HTML
  • XML
  • CSS
  • Search Engine Optimization/SEO
  • Freelancing as a web developer
  • Freelance writing
  • working from home
  • Laravel
  • WordPress
  • C Languages
  • Java
  • ASP.net
  • JQUERY
  • Ruby on rails
  • MySQL Database
  • SQL
  • PHP and MySQL
  • Remote server administration
  • Linux Command Line
  • Linux and Windows Servers
  • MAC and web development
  • PC vs MAC
  • Mobile Development
  • Mobile website optimization
  • PERL
  • AJAX
  • Adwords
  • CURL
  • Graphics
  • anything else related to web development!

That's just a list to fuel your mind. Feel free to submit any related topic. I will accept anything related to web development. I'm looking forward to some great blog posts! - Ian L.

Click Here to Sign Up and Begin Writing!

 

Troy Warren of LetsTalkBusinessRadio.Com is Scamming for Free online Work

I get so sick of people taking advantage of me online that today I added the "Scams" category to my blog. Troy Warren of LetsTalkBusinessRadio.Com is the client that has motivated me to put up this unfortunate category when he neglected to pay for services rendered by myself. I want to expose people like Troy Warren so it doesn't happen to someone else. If this post prevents one person from working for him and getting ripped off, I'll be glad I posted it. The amount he burned me for was not that much, which makes it a worse scam in many ways because if he was willing to stab me in the back over less than $200, think how quick he would be not to pay someone on a larger job. I don't know this person, Troy, from anywhere but from the client who referred him to me, but he acted like he was a big shot marketer who had plenty of money which caused me to let my guard down a little with him, but regardless, this is just one of many examples of why freelance workers online should always get at least a percentage of their payment up front EVERY TIME. I started out doing a small test project with Troy and accepted a small amount of money upfront before starting. Again I was careful as always with this client, but in the end, he still got me. It is really sad that we have to live in a world with people like Troy that we can never let our guard down in front of, but that seems to be the case. The best advice I can give freelance workers who conduct business over the internet, is to collect as much money up front as possible. I normally won't take on a new client without collecting at least 33% upfront and I try to get half. That way, if I do get ripped of, the sting is a little less than if I were to get taken for the entire project cost. Anyway, this will be the first of many posts on Jafty.com that exposes scammers like Troy to the online world. I may post some of the people that have scammed me in the past here as well if I can find their information. I will post all of Troys info below that I have to help others avoid working for this untrustworthy online predator. I also encourage others to post about people who have scammed them by not paying for services rendered. Let it be known that Troy never had a problem with the work that I did that he mentioned and we had a long conversation over the phone in which I was clear about what I was going to do and what I would charge him, so there was no excuse for him to justify withholding my payment. In fact he kept saying that he would pay it for 3 or 4 weeks in a row and failed to every time even though the agreement we had stated that he would pay on the first Friday after starting the work. I both started and finished before the first Friday and that Friday and every Friday after that, he had a new excuse for why my invoice was not paid. Now, I've heard of bad luck, but if you have time to make up so many excuses, you surely have time to log into PayPal and make the payment! I said this to Troy and he blamed it on his "Bookkeeper" I've never dealt with his bookkeeper before, so I don't know why he thought to blame it on a probably fictional bookkeeper, but that was the gist of most of the excuses. When I asked why he didn't just log into PayPal himself, he kept silent avoiding that question. More to come folks!

If anyone else would like to expose a scammer such as Troy Warren, I have now opened up my site to contributors and any creditable scam report will be published. Simply use the Contribute link in the main nav of this site and sign up to become a blogger and you're in!

How to Make Putty Automatically Login with User and Password

In this article, you'll learn to make a one-click Putty shortcut to your server from your desktop. What's so great about that? If you are a web developer or operate your own server and use Putty, then you probably know how much of a pain it is to have to open putty and enter the URL, user and password each time you need to open a command prompt on your remote server. Imagine being able to simply click a link on your desktop to open a command prompt to your remote server! Wouldn't that be great? I think it is. Here is how you can make a direct single click link to a remote server on your desktop:

  1. Locate your Putty program. Normally it would be somewhere like C:/ProgramFiles/Putty or similar. However, it could be anywhere. I installed mine in a special C:/Desktop/Tools directory as you can see in the image below, but yours is most likely in ProgramFiles.puttyfile
  2. Once you locate putty.exe as in the image above, right click on putty.exe and select "send to/Desktop(create shortcut)" to create a shortcut on your desktop. It will look like this:puttyshortcut
  3. Right click on the shortcut like in the above image and select "rename" and give the shortcut a name that identifies it as a link to your server such as example.com or whatever name you like.
  4. Right click on your new example.com shortcut and select "properties" and edit the target attribute to read: "C:\ProgramFiles\putty.exe root@207.150.12.233 -pw YourPassword". Be sure to change "C:\ProgramFIles" to the correct path of your putty.exe file. Change "root" to the user you would use to login to your remote server and edit "207.150.12.233" to equal either the IP address of the remote server or the domain name such as "example.com". Finally, edit "YourPassword" so that it is the correct password for the username you used in place of "root" previously. Once the target field is correct, click "Apply" then "OK" to commit the change.
  5. Now simply double click on your new shortcut and a command prompt to your server will magically open! Magic!

I've been using Putty for years and always thought there was no way to store a password for a remote server connection using Putty, so I was absolutely thrilled to learn of this little known secret for creating a desktop shortcut that logs you into your server with putty and without having to enter your password every time!